Why Oily Skins Still Need To Moisturize

In the world of skincare, there are five main skin types: dry, oily, combination, normal and mature. One of the easiest skin types to identify is an oily skin. Why? Well, that’s because an oily skin is one that supplies an excess amount of oil (or sebum) This can be presented as a ‘wet’ or shiny appearance on the face. Typically, this oiliness is localized to the T-Zone, which is the forehead, nose, and chin area. Typically, a skin type is developed from birth- so a genetic pass down from a family member. However, there are certain contributing factors that may also cause this, such as: hormones, stress, or mechanical damage (for example, over exfoliating and stripping the skins barrier)


Oil Vs Moisture

Now this is important – oil and hydration is different. Oil is, well oil. Whereas hydration is the water content in the skin. It is very possible to have an oily skin but be lacking water at the same time. I.e. An oily skin does not mean a hydrated skin.

Why Oily Skins Need To Moisturize

Our skin is clever. Without moisturizer, the skin becomes used to that lack of hydration, and ends up overcompensating by applying more oil as a defense mechanism to protect the skins barrier. But that over production of oil just means an increase in congestion in the pores, and potentially acne formation. With that said, the ultimate key is to ensure you are hydrating the skin, but without adding extra oil.

Moisturizers For Oily Skin

Instead of skipping moisturizer all together, oily skins need to opt for moisturizers that are non-comedogenic, lightweight, and that won’t clog the pores. Below is my favorite moisturizer as someone who suffers with oily, acne prone skin:


Conclusion

So, to conclude, just because a skin type is oily, it by no means excludes them from moisturizer. Remember, moisturizing is the basic foundation to ensuring our skin is healthy and functioning in synergy with the rest of our active products. Just make sure that you are using moisturizers that are oil free, and lightweight – your skin will thank you in the long run!

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Caring For The Skin During Menopause

Menopause is a natural process that occurs in a woman’s body, typically in her 40s to early 50s, marking the end of menstruation and her reproductive years. During this transition, there is a significant decrease in estrogen levels, which can trigger various concerns on the skin. Lets delve deeper into this topic!


Common Skin Changes During Menopause

During Menopause a woman can experiences changes on their skin such as dryness, sensitivity, acne breakouts, loss of elasticity, skin thinning, hyperpigmentation, fine lines, and wrinkles. These changes can be unsettling, but with the right skincare regimen and advice, their symptoms can be managed more effectively.

Ingredients for Menopausal Skin

Knowing what ingredients to use, and when to use them can be overwhelming for the skin during menopause. The most important thing to remember is to use products that are nourishing, and that aren’t going to strip your skin. Consider using ingredients such as:

  • Hyaluronic Acid: Restores moisture and improves elasticity.
  • Azelaic Acid: Helps soothe the skin and reduce redness.
  • Vitamin B5 (Panthenol): Restores the skins barrier, improves hydration, and soothes sensitive, menopausal skin.

Acne-Fighting Ingredients

For menopausal skin prone to acne or congestion, products containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide can help clean out pores and regulate oil secretion.

Pigmentation-Fighting Ingredients

Ingredients like retinol, vitamin C, and arbutin are effective in combating pigmentation by inhibiting the production of pigment-producing cells. Start with lower strengths and gradually increase as needed.

Nutrition and Stress Management

A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and antioxidants supports skin health during menopause. Additionally, managing stress is essential, as it can worsen skin conditions. Incorporate calming activities such as yoga or light exercise to release “feel-good” hormones like endorphins, which positively impact menopausal skin.

Consulting a Dermatologist or Doctor

If you’ve tried the above tips and are still experiencing persistent or severe concerns, don’t hesitate to seek advice from a professional. They may recommend prescription-strength medication that cannot be purchased over the counter.


As you enter Menopausal territory, remember that you are not alone. With the right knowledge, tools, and support, you can embrace this new chapter in your life with confidence and understanding.

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The Skin Barrier: Why It’s Essential For Healthy Skin

What, do you think, is the largest organ in the body? The heart, the lungs…

Wrong. The skin is the largest organ in the body! Just as we prioritize caring for vital internal organs, we should also give the utmost care and respect to our biggest organ – the skin.


What is the skin barrier?

Well, to start with, the skin is made up of three main layers: the epidermis, the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin, houses the skin barrier. This barrier acts as the first line of defense against external stimuli such as pollution, UV rays, and harsh weather. It also works to prevent unnecessary water loss from the skin. External stimuli can include harsh chemicals, strong ingredients, infections, and bacteria. The skin barrier functions like a knight in shining armor, ready to defend and protect the underlying layers of the skin

How do you know if your skin barrier is damaged?

Physically, a damaged skin barrier can present itself as flaking, redness, stinging, sensitivity, or acne breakouts. The causes of damage can vary. For instance, I have acne-prone skin, and it wasn’t until three years ago that I learned the importance of the skin barrier. Previously, I would aggressively treat my acne flare-ups with topical acids and retinols, which would excessively dry out my skin, leaving my skin barrier impaired and ruined for the following week.

Now that I understand the importance of the skin barrier, I have adopted a different approach to skincare. Instead of immediately resorting to acids and exfoliators, I now treat my acne with mild cleansers, hydrating and repairing moisturizers, and protect my skin from additional external irritants by applying SPF regularly. While my acne may not heal as quickly, I have noticed significant improvements in scarring, redness, and stinging…which in effect, makes the whole healing process shorter.

How do you keep your skin barrier healthy?

* Maintain moisture levels in the skin: Drink enough water and always apply a hydrating moisturizer.

* Don’t overuse active ingredients: Listen to your skin and only use what is necessary. Follow instructions regarding usage frequency and amount.

* Use barrier repairing ingredients: Incorporate ingredients such as Vitamin B3 (Niacinamide), Vitamin B5 (Panthenol), ceramides, Hyaluronic Acid, and squalene into your skincare routine.

* Choose mild cleansers: Alternate between foaming/exfoliating cleansers with gentler, milky/creamy cleansers.

* Apply SPF: Always apply sunscreen before leaving the house, regardless of the weather.


The takeaway from this blog is that without the skin barrier, our skin would be extremely vulnerable and susceptible to many serious concerns and disorders. Understanding its importance and adopting a routine that maximizes its duties, will ensure a healthy functioning skin barrier.

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